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Study shows patient on ketogenic diet living fully with IDH1-mutant glioblastoma
Health

Study shows patient on ketogenic diet living fully with IDH1-mutant glioblastoma

Washington [US], June 11 (ANI): A British man who rejected the standard of care to treat his brain cancer has lived with the typically fatal glioblastoma tumour growing very slowly after adopting a ketogenic diet, providing a case study that researchers say reflects the benefits of using the body's own metabolism to fight this particularly aggressive cancer instead of chemo and radiation therapy.Published in the journal Frontiers in Nutrition, the report is the first evaluation of the use of ketogenic metabolic therapy (KMT) without chemo or radiation interventions, on a patient diagnosed with IDH1-mutant glioblastoma (GBM). Ketogenic therapy is a non-toxic nutritional approach, viewed as complementary or alternative, that uses a low-carbohydrate, high-fat diet to manage a range of cancers...
Having trouble falling asleep predicts cognitive impairment in later life: Study
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Having trouble falling asleep predicts cognitive impairment in later life: Study

Washington [US], June 10 (ANI): A new study found that having trouble falling asleep, as compared to other patterns of insomnia, was the main insomnia symptom that predicted cognitive impairment 14 years later. The findings of the study were published in the journal 'Sleep'.Results show that having trouble falling asleep in 2002 was associated with cognitive impairment in 2016. Specifically, more frequent trouble falling asleep predicted poorer episodic memory, executive function, language, processing speed, and visuospatial performance.Further analysis found that associations between sleep initiation and later cognition were partially explained by both depressive symptoms and vascular diseases in 2014 for all domains except episodic memory, which was only partially explained by depressive...
Study shows new links between high fat diets, colon cancer
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Study shows new links between high fat diets, colon cancer

Washington [US], June 10 (ANI): A new study has found how high-fat diets can trigger a molecular cascade of events that leads to intestinal and colon cancer. The findings of the study were published in the journal 'Cell Reports'.For decades, physicians and dieticians have urged people to limit their intake of high-fat foods, citing links to poor health outcomes and some of the leading causes of death in the US, such as diabetes, heart disease and cancer.According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, dietary components high in saturated fats such as red meat are thought to be risk factors for colon cancer. Diet is thought to strongly influence the risk of colorectal cancer, and changes in food habits might reduce up to 70 per cent of this cancer burden.Other known epidemiologi...
Sleep disorders are associated with increased dementia risk in patients with TBI: Study
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Sleep disorders are associated with increased dementia risk in patients with TBI: Study

Washington [US], June 9 (ANI): Preliminary results from a study of more than 700,000 patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) show that those with a sleep disorder had an increased risk of developing dementia.Results show that over a median follow-up period of more than four years, TBI patients with a diagnosed sleep disorder were 25 per cent more likely to develop dementia. The results were similar when stratified by sex: Having a sleep disorder was associated with a 25.5 per cent increase in the risk of incident dementia in male persons with TBI and a 23.4 per cent increase in the risk of developing dementia in female persons with TBI."Our study's novelty is its confirmation of sleep disorders' association with incident dementia in both male and female patients, independently of other ...
No health worries for children born to mothers given seasonal flu vaccine in pregnancy: Study
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No health worries for children born to mothers given seasonal flu vaccine in pregnancy: Study

Ottawa [Canada], June 9 (ANI): A population-based study, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), has found flu vaccination during pregnancy does not lead to an increased risk of adverse early childhood health outcomes.Although pregnant people are not more susceptible to acquiring influenza infection, they are at an increased risk of severe illness and complications if they get the flu during pregnancy.For this reason, all pregnant people are advised to receive a flu shot each year, yet only 36 per cent received it according to a study monitoring four flu seasons in Nova Scotia. Safety concerns are reportedly a leading reason people may not receive influenza vaccination in pregnancy.Dr Deshayne Fell, an Associate Professor of Epidemiology in the Faculty of Medic...
Study shows how novel drug screen can individualise cancer therapy
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Study shows how novel drug screen can individualise cancer therapy

Washington [US], June 9 (ANI): A study conducted by researchers at the Ludwig Center at Harvard has demonstrated how a drug screening method known as dynamic BH3 profiling can be used to quickly identify potentially effective combinations of existing drugs for personalized cancer therapy."We know that cancer cells and healthy cells have different metabolisms," said Ludwig Harvard investigator Anthony Letai who, with former postdoctoral researcher Veerle Daniels, led the study reported in the Journal Science Signaling. "Using BH3 profiling, we found a specific metabolic dependency in triple-negative breast cancer cells obtained from a patient that we could target with an existing drug, making the cells more susceptible to death and priming them for a second targeted drug that could then tri...
Mandating vaccination could negatively impact voluntary compliance: Study
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Mandating vaccination could negatively impact voluntary compliance: Study

Washington [US], June 8 (ANI): Citizen opposition to COVID-19 vaccination has emerged worldwide, prompting pushes for mandatory vaccination policies. However, a new study based on evidence from Germany and on a model of the dynamic nature of people's resistance to COVID-19 vaccination sounds an alarm: mandating vaccination could negatively impact voluntary compliance.The findings of the study were published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). The authors of the study included Katrin Schmelz, and Samuel Bowles, among others. Majorities in many countries now favour mandatory vaccination. In March, the government of Galicia in Spain made vaccinations mandatory for adults, subjecting violators to substantial fines. Italy has made vaccinations mandatory for ca...
ADHD medications may reduce suicidality risk in certain children: Study
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ADHD medications may reduce suicidality risk in certain children: Study

Washington [US], June 8 (ANI): ADHD medications may lower suicide risk in children with hyperactivity, oppositional defiance, and other behavioural disorders, according to new research. The research was led by the Lifespan Brain Institute (LiBI) of Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) and the University of Pennsylvania.The findings of the study were published in the journal 'JAMA Network Open'. The results of the study address a significant knowledge gap in childhood suicide risk and could inform suicide prevention strategies at a time when suicide among children is on the rise."This study is an important step in the much-needed effort of childhood suicide prevention, as it leverages data collected from approximately 12,000 U.S. children to identify an actionable target to reduce chi...
World Brain Tumour Day 2021: Here’s how COVID affects the brain
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World Brain Tumour Day 2021: Here’s how COVID affects the brain

New Delhi [India], June 8 (ANI): For those who think COVID-19 is a respiratory disorder, it's the time to think again. As days pass, it has been emerging as the biggest threat to trigger a huge range of neurological disorders.Stroke, anxiety, confusion and fatigue are the few names from the long list. There are many instances when people have had complaints of challenges in staying focused, problems with memory and extreme tiredness after the mild illness.Neurological experts suggest that earlier nobody realized that the virus does cause problems in the brain but after much analysis, they realized that there could be many factors behind it. The coronavirus disrupts the oxygen flow in the body including the brain, resulting in blood-clotting and the hyper-inflammatory response of the immune...
Study suggests defying body clock associated with depression, lower wellbeing
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Study suggests defying body clock associated with depression, lower wellbeing

Washington [US], June 8 (ANI): People whose sleep pattern goes against their natural body clock are more likely to have depression and lower levels of wellbeing, according to a new study. The research, led by the University of Exeter, was published in the journal 'Molecular Psychiatry'.The study also found the most robust evidence to date that being genetically programmed to be an early riser is protective against major depression, and improves wellbeing.Researchers suggested this may be because society is set up to be more aligned to early risers, through the standard 9-5 working pattern.COVID-19 has led to more flexible working patterns and this research may help make the case for more adaptable working habits to suit individuals' needs.The team built on previous research which mapped 35...