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Leaders who listen to employees have more resilient teams, research show
Lifestyle

Leaders who listen to employees have more resilient teams, research show

Washington [US], June 11 (ANI): Leaders who encourage their employees to learn on the job and speak up with ideas and suggestions for change have teams that are more effective and resilient in the face of unexpected situations, according to new research from Rice University and the University of Windsor."A Resource Model of Team Resilience Capacity and Learning" will appear in a special issue of Group & Organization Management. Authors Kyle Brykman, an assistant professor at the Odette School of Business at the University of Windsor, and Danielle King, an assistant professor of psychological sciences at Rice, studied what makes employees more resilient and fosters learning in the workplace. The researchers specifically examined the interactions of 48 teams from five Canadian technology...
Study finds three factors that may predict college students’ loss of self-control
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Study finds three factors that may predict college students’ loss of self-control

Washington [US], June 11 (ANI): Joining a club that sparks a new interest, playing a new intramural sport or finding a new group of friends may be just as indicative of a college freshman's loss of self-control as drinking or drug use, according to new research at West Virginia University.Self-control, the ability to exercise personal restraint, inhibit impulsivity and make purposeful decisions in that first year partly depends on a student's willingness to try new things, including things adults would call "good."That's a new finding, according to Kristin Moilanen, associate professor of child development and family studies. The study, "Predictors of initial status and change in self-control during the college transition," observed 569 first-year students ages 18-19 at five points over th...
Study links politics, boredom with breaking public-health rules
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Study links politics, boredom with breaking public-health rules

Washington [US], June 10 (ANI): According to the findings of a new psychology research, people who are more prone to boredom and are socially conservative have a higher probability of breaking public-health rules.The study was published in the journal Motivation and Emotion. While previous research demonstrated a connection between being highly prone to boredom and breaking social-distancing rules, this study demonstrated the association was more prominent as participants' social conservatism increased."Many public-health measures such as wearing a mask or getting a vaccine have become highly politicized," said James Danckert, professor of psychology at the University of Waterloo. "People who find these measures a threat to their identity, and who suffer from boredom a lot, find breaking t...
Study suggests more ‘fairness’ required in conservation
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Study suggests more ‘fairness’ required in conservation

Washington [US], June 10 (ANI): The findings of a new study suggests that what is often assumed to be 'fair' in conservation practice might not be considered so by the very people most affected by it.The study published in the journal Environmental Science and Policy also found that a new approach is needed if protected areas are to be effective.From the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies based at James Cook University, Lead author Dr Georgina Gurney said considering local stakeholder conceptions of fairness in conservation is critical."If conservation is perceived as unfair it can lead to conflict, undermining support and cooperation," Dr Gurney said.She said it is an ethical matter and key to achieving good outcomes for people and the environment. "But what is fairness? Very...
Game time, travel direction associated with college football team performance: Study
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Game time, travel direction associated with college football team performance: Study

Washington [US], June 10 (ANI): A study of NCAA Division I college football games found a significant association between the performance of away teams and both their direction of travel and the time of day when games were played. The findings of the study were published in the journal 'Sleep'.Results show that away teams playing in the afternoon allowed 5 per cent more points and forced 13 per cent more opponent turnovers than those playing in the evening. Teams traveling eastward to play on the road threw 39 per cent more interceptions than those traveling in the same time zone.There also was a significant interaction between direction of travel and time of day for points allowed, and a marginal interaction for points scored."Most notably, we found that teams playing in the afternoon act...
Study finds evidence that dreams reflect multiple memories, anticipate future events
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Study finds evidence that dreams reflect multiple memories, anticipate future events

Washington [US], June 9 (ANI): Dreams result from a process that often combines fragments of multiple life experiences and anticipates future events, according to novel evidence from a new study in the Journal Sleep.The journal Sleep is the annual meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies, a joint venture of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine and the Sleep Research Society.Results show that 53.5 per cent of dreams were traced to a memory, and nearly 50 per cent of reports with a memory source were connected to multiple past experiences.The study also found that 25.7 per cent of dreams were related to specific impending events, and 37.4 per cent of dreams with a future event source were additionally related to one or more specific memories of past experiences. Future-orient...
Taking short breaks may help our brains learn new skills
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Taking short breaks may help our brains learn new skills

Washington [US], June 9 (ANI): In a study of healthy volunteers, National Institutes of Health researchers have mapped out the brain activity that flows when we learn a new skill, such as playing a new song on the piano, and discovered why taking short breaks from practice is a key to learning.The researchers found that during rest the volunteers' brains rapidly and repeatedly replayed faster versions of the activity seen while they practised typing a code. The more a volunteer replayed the activity the better they performed during subsequent practice sessions, suggesting rest strengthened memories."Our results support the idea that wakeful rest plays just as important a role as practice in learning a new skill. It appears to be the period when our brains compress and consolidate memories ...
Football, team handball training may increase lifespan of women: Study
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Football, team handball training may increase lifespan of women: Study

Washington [US], June 8 (ANI): In the quest for healthy aging and a longer lifespan, Danish researchers at the University of Southern Denmark collaborated with Swedish researchers at Karolinska Institutet to explore the anti-aging effects of football and team handball training. The findings of the study were published in the journal 'Scientific Reports'.The researchers investigated the effects of lifelong regular exercise on two of the central hallmarks of aging combined and showed that football and team handball have a positive effect on telomere length and mitochondrial function in women."Our legacy consists of DNA that is packed in chromosomes. When cells divide, the inheritance is copied, but with each cell division the ends of the DNA threads get shorter. The so-called telomeres are s...
Game-based program boosts physical activity among diabetes patients: Study
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Game-based program boosts physical activity among diabetes patients: Study

Washington [US], June 5 (ANI): People with diabetes could be motivated toward increasing their physical activity by following game-based programs and routines, a new study suggested. Findings from the study, conducted by a team from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, were published in the journal 'JAMA Network Open'.By making a game out of getting their daily steps, the new research pointed to the possibility that people with diabetes could be nudged toward increasing their physical activity, with changes lasting for a full year.Since many now use apps or other digital means to manage their diabetes, this program - which utilised tools like wearable step counters and electronic scales with personalised goals - could potentially be integrated to help individu...
Perforated rubber sandals for almost Rs 40,000. Would you buy this Gucci?
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Perforated rubber sandals for almost Rs 40,000. Would you buy this Gucci?

New Delhi [India], June 6 (ANI): Sliding the casual look into their latest summer slip-on sandals, Gucci has launched pebble-textured rubber mules in both men and women categories.The luxury fashion brand has priced its newly rolled out footwear at USD 420 (for men at around Rs 30,660) and USD 470 (for women at around Rs 34,000). Resembling Crocs, this all-new slip-on sandal has been launched in three different shades in both categories.In Men's category, the sandal comes in black, red and bright blue colours with rubber sole. Whereas, in the Women's category, it is available in again black, lilac and white with rubber platform lug sole.Gucci's slip-on sandal is made of "perforated rubber" and is designed in a way to give it a premium leather look. It has finished with smooth detailing aro...